Monday, October 31, 2011

"Much more my gain"

This beautiful poem is on an ancient tombstone near where we live, from the English settlers that worked on the mines many years ago.  It shows a right attitude about death, something that will be good to remember during the next few days.
"In perfect health I went from home,
Not knowing that my race was run,
As flowers grow and then decay,
A sudden death snatched me away.

Little thought my time so short,
In this world to remain,
When from my home I went away,
And hoped to return again.

The stroke of death did end my time,
And cut me off just in my prime,
Short was my life, sharp was my pain,
Great was your loss, much more my gain."

Farewell my wife and brother so dear,
I am not dead, but sleeping here.
My debt is paid, my grave you see,
Therefore prepare to follow me.

3 comments:

Derek Metters said...

Hi
My name is Derek Metters
I live in the UK
My Grandfather's cousin Richard Charles Metters was buried in the cemetery in Real del Monte. His wife had a head stone put up to his memory with the poem starting "In perfect health I went from home...." on it. Is this the tombstone in your blog 31 Oct 2011.
Thanks
derek.metters@btinternet.com

Sarah Joy said...

Hello, Derek! Yes, I took this picture at Real del Monte. I may have a picture of the name, but it's on a hard drive I can't access right now. I was touched by the hope expressed in the poem. You may use the picture as you like.

Derek Metters said...

Thanks for the reply and the offer. The full inscription is:
In Loving Memory of Richard beloved husband of Frances Barbara METTERS of Haverig who departed April 11th 1888 aged 21 years

In perfect health I went from home
Not thinking my race was run
As flowers grow and then decay
Sudden death snatched me away
Little I thought my time so short
This world to remain,
And from my home I went away,
Never to return again,
The stroke of death ended my time,
Cut me off in my prime,
Short was my life sharp was my pain,
Farewell my wife and my brother so dear,
I am not dead but sleeping here,
My debt is paid my grave you see,
Therefore prepare to follow me.

Grave 435
From www.cornish-mexico.org
In fact according to other records he was 24 and had been married for 2 years when he died or was killed.
He was born on the Cornish/Devon border in UK and moved to Cumberland then to work in Mexico. The Cornish Gaveyard or Panteon de los Ingleses is full of the graves of Cornish miners, they took pasties, football (soccer) and Methodism to Mexico.